2013-04-24

Real Sprints


Agile methodologies talk about "sprints" - workloads organized into one to four week blocks. You schedule tasks for each sprint, you endeavour to complete all of it by the end of the sprint, then you look back and see how close your expectations (schedule) were to reality (what actually got done).

Wait, wait, back up. When I think of a sprint, I think short and fast. That's what sprinting means. You can't sprint for a month straight; you'll die. That's a marathon, not a sprint.

There are numerous coding competitions out there. Generally, you get around 48 hours, give or take, to build an entire, working, functional game or application. Think about that. You get two days to build a complete piece of software from scratch. Now that's what I call sprinting.

Of course, a 48 hour push is a lot to ask for on a regular basis; sure, your application isn't in a competition, this is the real world, and you need to get real work done on an ongoing basis. You can't expect your developers to camp out in sleeping bags under their desks. But that doesn't mean turning a sprint into a marathon.

The key is instilling urgency, while moderating burnout. This is entirely achievable, and can even make development more fun and engaging for the whole team.Since the term sprint has already been thoroughly corrupted, I'll use the term "dash". Consider this weekly schedule:
  • Monday: Demo last week's accomplishments for stakeholders, and plan this week's dash. This is a good week to schedule any unavoidable meetings.
  • Tuesday and Wednesday: your 48 hours to get it done and working. These are crunch days, and they will probably be pretty exhausting. These don't need to be 18-hour days, but 10 hours wouldn't be unreasonable. Let people get in the zone and stay there as long as they can.
  • Thursday: Refactoring and peer reviews. After a run, athletes don't just take a seat and rest; they slow to a jog, then a walk. They stretch. The cool off slowly. Developers, as mental athletes, should do the same.
  • Friday: Testing. QA goes through the application with a fine-toothed comb. The developers are browsing the web, playing games, reading books, propping their feet up, and generally being lazy bums, with one exception: they're available at a moment's notice if a QA has any questions or finds any issues. Friday is a good day for your development book club to meet.
  • By the end of the week, your application should be ready again for Monday's demo, and by Tuesday, everyone should be well-rested and ready for the next dash.
Ouch. That's a tough sell. The developers are only going to spend two days a week implementing features? And one basically slacking off? Balderdash! Poppycock!

Think about it, though. Developers aren't factory workers; they can't churn out X lines of code per hour, 40 hours per week. That's not how it works. A really talented developer might achieve 5 or 6 truly productive hours per day, but at that rate, they'll rapidly burn out. 4 hours a day might be sustainable for longer. Now, mind you, in those four hours a day, they'll get more done, better, with fewer defects, than an army of incompetent developers could do in a whole week. But the point stands: you can't run your brain at maximum capacity eight hours straight, five days a week. You just can't - not for long, anyway.

The solution is to plan to push yourself, and to plan to relax, and to keep the cycle going to maximize the effectiveness of those productive hours. It's also crucial not to discount refactoring as not being productive; it sets up the following weeks' work, and reduces the effort required to get the rest of the development done for the rest of the life of the application. It's a critical investment in the future.

Spending a third of your development time on refactoring may seem excessive, and if it were that simple, I'd agree. But if you really push yourself for two days, you can get a lot done - and write a lot of code to be reviewed and refactored. In one day of refactoring, you can learn a lot, get important work done, and still start to cool off from the big dash.

That lazy Friday really lets you relax, improve your craft, and get your product ready for next week, when you get to do it all over again.
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